How to Survive the Endless Extras

Sometimes I wake up on a Monday morning and I am already exhausted. My two girls are in two different schools across town from each other about an hour drive apart. I have physical therapy three times a week following a recent surgery, and both kids have “extras.” My oldest takes art and theater, for which she has practice three times weekly, and the youngest takes karate two to three times a week. This is on top of work, being a wife, mother, friend, daughter…the list goes on. With school starting back up, all the “extras” eat away at my barely-balancing schedule (and sanity).  We are constantly on the run. How do you survive the Endless Extras?!?

1. TAKE A BREATH

Take a deep breath! Relax a minute…breathe!!! I am the QUEEN of overreacting, but as my children have grown older I am finding that I can’t have an emotional meltdown on a random Friday because my preteen is already having her own meltdown, so I must calm down and just breathe. Once you step back a minute, you can prioritize all the things you have going on.

2. TAKE A BREAK

Take a break! When you are in the middle of watching the kids at basketball practice or waiting to be called back to the doctor, take a break. Bring something with you that calms your mind: a book, a crossword puzzle, something that is disconnected from social media and work. Use these snippets of time to rejuvenate yourself. It is a natural calm, even if it is just for five minutes.

3. TAKE TURNS

Take turns with your significant other or support network. I know it is so easy to try to be Super Mom, but take advantage of the offers of help and do something for you. It doesn’t have to be a Spa Day Tuesday, but maybe you take that extra hour to make a dinner you and your family love but never have the time to make. Maybe you take a bubble bath when no one else is home. Taking turns, even if it does not break down to 50/50, will make you appreciate your significant other and/or support group more and will keep you from burning out. It will also help your significant other and/or support group understand what a day in the life of YOU looks like, so when you do have that occasional meltdown, they know what you are going through!